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SF mayor names Mission Housing exec to Treasure Island policy board

Sam Moss is Executive Director of Mission Housing Development Corporation. He has served in various capacities with Mission Housing since 2008, and is active with several community-based organizations. Photo by Tony Bear!

Sam Moss joins Treasure Island Development Authority Board of Directors

Mayor Ed Lee has appointed Sam Moss, Executive Director of Mission Housing Development Corporation, to the Treasure Island Development Authority Board of Directors.

The Treasure Island Development Authority is a nonprofit organization formed to oversee the economic development of the San Francisco neighborhood at the northernmost area of District 6. The seven-member Board of Directors, appointed by San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, is the de facto governing body of Treasure Island.

Mission Housing Development Corporation | Mayor Ed Lee, Sam Moss

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee (right) with Mission Housing exec Sam Moss after the ceremony where Moss was sworn-in as a member of the Treasure Island Development Authority Board of Directors. Photo by Tony Bear!

Stewardship of a regional treasure

A nonprofit organization, the Treasure Island Development Authority was created to act as both the development agency and the trustee of the Tideland Trust for Treasure and Yerba Buena Islands. Charged with ensuring the island is used in an environmentally and economically viable way, the Treasure Island Development Authority Board of Directors create and manage the master development plan and make policy decisions critical to the future of the former naval station.

Board members also approve large contracts, and the authority’s annual budget. The full board meets on the second Wednesday of each month at San Francisco City Hall. The meetings are also carried on SFGov-TV.

ā€œIā€™m honored to serve San Francisco, and look forward to providing an Affordable Housing- and Community Development-focused mindset to Treasure Island,” said Moss. “This is an amazing opportunity to ensure significant amounts of affordable housing are included not only physically but equitably as well.ā€

Naval Station Treasure Island

The artificial island in San Francisco Bay was used by the U.S. Government as a base of operations for the U. S. Navy from 1942 until being decommissioned in 1996. Navy operations ended there in 1997, although several federal agencies still maintain a presence on the island.

The City of San Francisco paid $108 million to acquire the property in 2007. Treasure Island is now open to the public and is home to more than 2,000 residents, commercial tenants, schools, athletic organizations and community organizations.

In 2011, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a redevelopment project on Treasure Island and parts of Yerba Buena Island, with a goal of creating a new San Francisco neighborhood.

The Treasure Island Project

Construction has begun on the Treasure Island Development, a 405-acre redevelopment project that is a joint venture between Lennar Corporation and Kenwood Investments. The partnership is now developing as many as 8,000 homes, some offered at below-market rates. Also part of the master plan: extensive open spaces, three hotels, and 240,000 square feet of restaurants, retail, entertainment venues and office space.

The Treasure Island Development Authority is overseeing the project, which could take fifteen years to complete.

Information from Wikipedia and sftreasureisland.org contributed to this post

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