Plans for Balboa Park Station, where three Muni trains, four BART lines and seven bus lines converge, include a reimagined plaza that’s more accessible to pedestrians, cyclists and those with mobility impairments as well as a more inviting community space to surrounding neighborhoods.

BART staff members have been leading town halls this month showing design changes made in response to feedback, such as more variety to open space and greater safety upgrades including new lighting and security cameras in the plaza, along pedestrian paths and around the station’s perimeter.

BART Board member Janice Li, whose district includes the Balboa Park Station, spoke at a virtual town hall last Saturday— the second of three scheduled to round out the year — to tout the “public benefits” to riders that will flow from the project.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Julio Lara
Senior Communications Manager
Jlara@MissionHousing.org

Sept. 8, 2020

Mission Housing secures funding for major rehabilitation project at South Park

(San Francisco, Calif.) — A much-needed rehabilitation is on its way.

Mission Housing is proud to announce that crucial funding for the rehabilitation of three historic Single Resident Occupancy hotels — Hotel Madrid, Park View and Gran Oriente — has been secured.

“Our mission isn’t just to build more homes,” said Mission Housing Executive Director Sam Moss. “We also work hard to ensure the quality of life for our tenants is the highest available. This is why we’re very excited and pleased we can begin work on these three SROs.”

All three SROs are located on South Park Street — less than a quarter-mile from Oracle Park in San Francisco. The process to rehab all three hotels began in 2018 right after Mission Housing acquired the historic Gran Oriente — deciding to then combine all three buildings into a scattered sites project with financing that includes tax credits and bonds, along with Chase Bank and the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community and Development as major supporters.

“The rehabilitation of the three South Park Street sites will revitalize much needed affordable housing in San Francisco and provide support for the formerly homeless,” said James Vossoughi, Vice President, Community Development Banking, Chase. “We’re excited to work with Mission Housing and continue to be committed to supporting critical projects like this that help local communities thrive.”

This project will allow Mission Housing to keep housed our most vulnerable community members in the almost completely gentrified South Park area. 

The next steps are the construction and temporary relocation of current residents.

“I’m humbled to see that even during a pandemic we are able to continue our essential services work and provide a dignified home to our residents at South Park.” said Mission Housing Deputy Executive Director Marcia Contreras.

Mission Housing expects to complete the project in the Fall of 2021.  We look forward to working on this project with the continued support of the entire staff and our new property manager FPI Management. 

About Hotel Madrid: Hotel Madrid is one of two South Park Residence properties that Mission Housing Development Corporation acquired and rehabbed in 1987. Hotel Madrid now provides permanent housing for formerly homeless and very low-income adults. After renovation, the staff established on-site programs to assist the hotel’s 44 special needs and formerly homeless residents.

About Park View: Along with the Hotel Madrid, the Park View Hotel was acquired and rehabbed in 1987. It now houses 40 formerly homeless and very low-income adults.

About Gran Oriente:  Built in 1907, the Gran Oriente Hotel became one of the earliest Filipino-owned buildings in the South of Market Area when it was purchased in the 1920s by members of The Gran Oriente Filipino Masonic fraternity.

When Filipino community leaders such as SOMCAN, SOMA Pilipinas, and The Filipino Community Development Corporation learned of a potential sale, they reached out to San Francisco District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim to facilitate a solution in keeping ownership of the property in community hands, so its affordability would be positioned to survive for future generations. Supervisor Kim connected the organizers with Mission Housing.

To support the purchase, Mission Housing received a $5 million loan from the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development Small Sites Program.

The Gran Oriente is currently 24 units.

In the News: Planning Commission Approves Safe Parking Site at Balboa Upper Yard

The San Francisco Planning Commission on Thursday unanimously approved plans for a temporary vehicle triage center that would provide a safe parking space for people who live in their vehicles.

According to the plan, the center would be located at 2340 San Jose Ave., the future site of Balboa Upper Yards, a 138-unit affordable housing complex developed by Mission Housing Development Corporation. Construction on the complex won’t start until October 2020, so the space would only serve as a temporary spot.

“We’re proud at Mission Housing to continue our tradition of leading with bold ideas to battle our housing shortage crisis,” said Sam Moss, Executive Director at the nonprofit.

The pilot program would provide space for 33 vehicles, allow people to park long-term and camp in their vehicles overnight, and offer amenities like restrooms, showers, laundry facilities, a kitchen and eating areas.

“Connecting families to services and supporting them during difficult times should be our direct response to the needs of our community,” said Mission Housing’s Deputy Executive Director, Marcia Contreras. “It’s a fundamental act of human compassion and kindness. Mission Housing believes strongly in supporting our families in need and connecting them to resources.”

Residents would be allowed to stay for up to 90 days, and after that their stay could be extended at the director’s discretion.

The space would also be equipped with security and office space to provide onsite services for those living in their vehicles.

Read more about it from Bay City News here.

Mission Housing makes good on Mayor Breed’s Executive Directive; announces construction of 4 new ADUs

San Francisco, CA — Mayor London N. Breed today announced that in the six months since she issued an Executive Directive to accelerate the approvals of Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), also known as in-law units, the City has cleared its application backlog. As a result of this action, the City permitted more in-law units than it did in the previous three years when the City’s in-law program was first launched.

The Executive Directive Mayor Breed issued at the end of August called for the backlog of 919 units waiting for approval to be cleared and for all new applications to acted on within four months. It also called on City departments to set clear, objective code standards, and work to improve the application process for people looking to build in-law units. Since then, 439 of the backlogged in-law units have been permitted, over 90% of which are subject to rent-control, and the rest of the applications have been reviewed by the relevant departments and are awaiting responses from the applicants.

“We have made good progress to get this housing approved faster, and we will continue to work to encourage applicants to come forward to build new in-law units,” said Mayor London Breed. “This is just a first step. I will not let our bureaucracy stand in the way of building more housing, especially new rent-controlled housing, because we need more places for people to live in San Francisco. Whether it’s streamlining the approval process or eliminating permitting fees, we can and will do more to get more housing built in our neighborhoods.”

Since 2014, the City departments involved in permitting housing did not have clear and consistent standards on what is needed to add new ADU units to existing single family homes and apartment buildings. Instead, departments preferred to handle these complex applications on a case-by-case basis, resulting in unnecessarily long review periods, inconsistencies in direction to project applicants, and a large backlog of permit applications.

Since the Executive Directive was issued, the City has received applications for 206 new units, all of which were reviewed within the four-month timeframe. Of those new applications, 18 units have so far been approved, while the remainder have been reviewed and are awaiting responses from the applicants. Mayor Breed made the announcement today at a Mission Housing Development Corp. property where new in-law units are planned to be created from former garages.

“Mission Housing is excited to lead the charge for the Affordable Housing Community as we increase our affordable housing stock by what could be hundreds of new units converted from our existing Garages,” said Sam Moss, Executive Director of Mission Housing. “During times such as these, in the midst of this housing shortage crisis, it’s important that every neighborhood prioritizes new housing, and thanks to Mayor Breed’s leadership we’re one step closer to solving the housing crisis. Mission Housing Development Corp. is in the business of housing San Francisco’s low income community not its cars.”

As part of the Mayor’s acceleration effort, several process improvements were made by the City departments involved in issuing permit approvals. A streamlined “roundtable” review process was introduced where multiple reviewing departments, including the Planning Department, Department of Building Inspection (DBI), Fire Department, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, and the Department of Public Works came together concurrently to review applications. This improvement allowed all agencies to issue comments or requests for plan revisions to ADU applicants all at once, instead of the former linear process.

Efforts to clarify and expedite the application process have benefited from the addition of public services and documents now available to applicants, including:

  • Optional meetings before filing with the Planning, Building, and Fire Departments, allowing for early multi-agency collaboration and identification of red flags;
  • Public information sessions on ADUs for design professionals and homeowners;
  • Dedicated department staff to provide informative and consistent advice to applicants;
  • Both new and updated public information documents, including a first-ever multi-agency“ADU Checklist” to outline all requirements and submittal guidelines for each agency;
  • An updated “ADU Handbook” to reflect legislative updates and requirements for permitting.The Mayor recently introduced legislation to eliminate DBI permitting fees for ADUs and 100% affordable housing projects. Permitting fees are a significant part of ADU project costs and fees on 100% affordable housing can range upwards of $100,000-$150,000 per project.”We are happy to see Mayor Breed and Mission Housing continue to find ways to increase affordable housing opportunities,” said Dora Orante on behalf of the tenants at Abel Gonzales. “We’re also grateful for the creative ways housing can be designed to help others live in one of these units.”

    Further information about the City of San Francisco’s Accessory Dwelling Unit program is available online at sfdbi.org/adu.