La Fénix is Risen

Site that once served as the City’s inaugural navigation center opens its doors to 155 families and provides 100% affordable housing for San Franciscans

San Francisco, CA — Mayor London N. Breed today celebrated the grand opening of a 100% affordable housing project in the Mission at La Fénix at 1950 Mission Street. Located between 15th and 16th Streets, near the 16th Street BART station, the building consists of 155 permanently affordable apartments for low-income households and will include 40 units for formerly homeless families; there are two additional units for on-site property management. It is the second of seven new 100% affordable housing developments in the Mission that are either already open, under construction, or will open in the next 18 months, following over a decade in which no new affordable housing was built in the neighborhood.

VIDEO: VIEW FULL. CEREMONY HERE

“I am excited to join community and project partners in the Mission today to celebrate the opening of 155 new homes for San Francisco families,” said Mayor Breed. “Projects like this one and the others that will break ground over the coming years are critical to addressing so many of the challenges we face as a city. Creating new, affordable places for our residents to live will help us recover from this pandemic and ensure our residents can continue to live and thrive in the neighborhood they call home.”

Built with families in mind, amenities at La Fénix include a rooftop playground, landscaped courtyards, a spacious community room with a kitchen, and a communal laundry room. Located near BART and several Muni lines, this transit-oriented housing development will help advance the City’s climate goals by promoting the use of public transportation. Residents of La Fenix receive transit passes, and project funding has been directed for pedestrian and bike improvements.

The ground floor features community-serving uses that include a childcare center operated by Mission Neighborhood Centers (MNC), art studios and a gallery operated by Acción Latina, as well as a bicycle repair shop operated by PODER. These community-serving programs are open to residents and the surrounding neighbors. A quarter of the homes at 1950 Mission are for residents of the surrounding the neighborhood.

The housing development at 1950 Mission Street is an excellent example of creative interim and future uses of City-owned property to help address homelessness and affordable housing in San Francisco. 1950 Mission was once a San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) facility with temporary, movable classroom buildings and surface parking. In June 2007, the SFUSD Board of Education approved a resolution designating 1950 Mission as surplus property. Shortly thereafter, pursuant to the California Education Code, SFUSD put the site up for sale, which the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development (MOHCD) identified and purchased in September 2014 to develop affordable housing.

Following MOHCD’s purchase of 1950 Mission, and in an effort to meet the growing need for safe and secure transitional services for the city’s unhoused population, the site was transformed into the City’s first interim-use navigation center, operated by the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing (HSH). The navigation center served people experiencing homelessness in close proximity to the site with the goal of placing clients into permanent housing.

“What a win for the community when we can take an underused public lot and create more than 150 new deeply affordable homes!” said Supervisor Hillary Ronen. “Congratulations to Mission Housing and Bridge on this spectacular partnership. And to the families moving in, welcome home to La Fenix!”

In July 2015, MOHCD selected Mission Housing Development Corporation (MHDC) and BRIDGE Housing to develop, own, and operate the affordable housing development proposed for the site.

“Mission Housing is proud and honored, along with BRIDGE Housing, to bring 157 units of new, 100 percent affordable family housing to the Mission,” said Sam Moss, Executive Director of Mission Housing Development Corporation. “We hope La Fénix will be a beacon of hope and support for the Mission District and all of San Francisco’s low-income community.”

“We’re thrilled to bring 100% affordable family homes and new spaces for community services to the neighborhood,” said Smitha Seshadri, Executive Vice President of BRIDGE Housing. “Collaborative developments like La Fénix will help the Mission maintain its rich history of vibrancy and diversity.”

Major financing for 1950 Mission was provided by a $45 million investment from MOHCD that enabled the $113 million project to move forward. In addition to the City’s investment, the development was made possible by financing from the State of California Housing and Community Development Affordable Housing and Sustainable Community Program. Other financial partners include the California Community Reinvestment Corporation; California Debt Limit Allocation Committee; California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco.

“Projects like La Fenix showcase the shared commitment by community leaders, Mayor Breed and the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development to develop well designed affordable housing that meets the needs of residents, while also enhancing the character of the neighborhood,” said MOHCD Director, Eric Shaw. “Our longstanding partnership with the state allowed us to leverage city affordable housing funds with state affordable housing programs to ensure the 1950 Mission had the financing to be constructed and be permanently affordable for low income residents.”

“As the site of the first navigation center, 1950 Mission has been at the heart of new ways to care for and solve homelessness in San Francisco,” said Sam Dodge, Interim Director, Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. “This former school site allowed us to temporarily shelter hundreds of people while it was in the predevelopment phase and it will now become home 40 formerly homeless families in large apartments steps away from BART in the middle of the Mission. Thank you to the Mission community for years of support in making this happen.”

The nine-story building, designed by local architects, David Baker Architects and Cervantes Design Associated, includes studios, one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom apartments. Construction started in January 2019 and was completed in January 2021.

Avanza 490 now accepting applications

Avanza 490 is one step closer to having dozens of families call it “home.”

Some 18 months after breaking ground at 490 South Van Ness, the 100-percent affordable housing development is accepting applications from May 11 to June 8, 2020 for 60 affordable studios, one-, two-, and three-bedroom units — marking another huge milestone for partners Mission Housing and BRIDGE Housing.

“With the chaos going on in the world right now it’s important to remember the hard work the community has put in to get us to this point,” said Sam Moss, Executive Director at Mission Housing. “81 units of 100% affordable family housing ensuring that hundreds of people will have a safe, high-quality home at a time like this is what’s most important.”

Applications must be submitted online at housing.sfgov.org using San Francisco DAHLIA Portal. For assistance, applicants are encouraged to contact one of the housing counseling agencies listed at housing.sfgov.org/housing-counselors. All applicants are encouraged to apply. Income and other restrictions apply. Subsidies and vouchers are welcome.

[Visit AVANZA490.ORG for Income Requirements]

“We understand the need for affordable housing in San Francisco,” said Mission Housing Deputy Executive Director Marcia Contreras. “I am personally honored and thrilled to be able to present 81 units of affordable housing opportunities to our community in D-9 and throughout San Francisco that will include vital onsite services to all of our residents. We hope this brings hope to many of the families needing housing during these difficult times but most importantly, make sure you apply.”

Along with its 81 units, Avanza 490 will feature a community room with kitchen, a second floor courtyard, rooftop terrace, bike parking, on-site laundry, and professional on-site management.

Mission Housing will lead a consortium of community partners, in order to provide on-site supportive services. Another partner, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, will provide health and wellness programs and services for children, youth, adults, and families. People Organizing to Demand Environmental and Economic Rights, otherwise known as PODER, will organize Avanza 490 residents around social issues, and provide leadership training.

The deadline to submit an application is June 8, 2020 at 5 p.m. The lottery for Avanza 490 will take place June 22, 2020.

For more information about Avanza 490, please visit Avanza490.org.

Units are monitored through the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development and are subject to monitoring and other restrictions. Preferences will be given in the following order:

1. Households in which one member holds a Certificate of Preference (COP) from the former San Francisco Redevelopment Agency will be given the highest preference in the lottery ranking process.

2. Households in which one member holds a Displaced Tenant Housing Preference (DTHP) Certificate will be given the second highest preference in the lottery ranking process. DTHP applies up to 12 units.

3. Households applying with the Neighborhood Resident Housing Preference (NRHP) Program will be given the third highest preference in the lottery ranking process. NRHP applies up to 24 units at initial lease up.

4. Households that submit acceptable documentation that at least one member lives or works in San Francisco will be given the fourth highest preference in the lottery ranking process.

For further information or confirmation of preferences, please call Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development Certificate Hotline: 415.701.5613. Applicants in each preference category must meet program requirements in order to enter into a lease agreement.

Dev/Mission Announces New Lease Agreement with Mission Housing

For immediate release:

(SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.) — One of the premier Resident Services collaborations in San Francisco is taking another step forward.

On June 3, 2019, two years after agreeing to partner and incubate at one of Mission Housing Development Corporation’s marquee buildings, <dev/Mission> has signed a new lease agreement with the nonprofit developer making Valencia Gardens, located at 360 Valencia St., the official headquarters of the tech nonprofit.

“When we incubated dev/Mission two years ago, we could only dream that Leo and his team would reward our faith the way that they have,” said Sam Moss, Executive Director at Mission Housing. “We’re beyond proud of dev/Mission’s success. They’re further proof that Mission Housing’s commercial tenants thrive when they’re truly community partners, and we’ll continue to support these invaluable assets to our communities because that is the Mission Housing way.”

Mission Housing and dev/Mission are pleased to extend an invitation to the public on June 3, 2019 for the official ribbon cutting ceremony at the official headquarters of dev/Mission — 360 Valencia St. in the heart of the Mission District.

“Dev/Mission is very thankful to our partner Mission Housing Development Corporation for working together with our leadership team to develop this amazing lease that will help us enhance and deliver programming in the Mission District for years to come,” said Leo Sosa, Executive Director of dev/Mission.

“You know your work matters when you support  an amazing organization and partner such as dev/Mission,” said Marcia Contreras, Deputy Executive Director at Mission Housing.

“Mission Housing is thrilled to be able to secure a space for dev/Mission, but most importantly what this space represents to so many young adults. We believed in the vision that Leo Sosa presented to us two years ago. Today, we celebrate a mutual collaboration that has produced opportunities to so many, but most importantly it has empowered our young adults to believe in themselves and become our future leaders in the tech industry. They will now be responsible to open doors to others coming behind them within our own community.”

Launched two years ago, dev/Mission aims to train untapped young adults ages 16 to 24 for careers in tech.

To learn more about <dev/Mission> and to participate in this event please contact Leo Sosa at leo@devmission.org.

Event details:

When: Monday June 3rd, 2019

Where: Dev/Mission HQ (360 Valencia Street)

Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm

dev/mission-invite

ABOUT MISSION HOUSING:

Mission Housing Development Corporation is a nonprofit, community-based organization creating and preserving high-quality affordable housing, and providing supportive services for residents of low and moderate incomes in the Mission District and throughout San Francisco. For more information on Mission Housing, visit MissionHousing.org.

ABOUT <DEV/MISSION>:

Our Mission: To train untapped young adults for careers in technology. 

Our Vision: To build wealth and prosperity in our local diverse communities through jobs in technology.

Our Goal: Our goal is to connect the most overlooked population in San Francisco, Bay Area and beyond; and expose them to careers in the tech industry.

Contact:

Leonardo Sosa, Executive Director

(415) 572.3947

leonardososa@devmission.org

Julio Lara, Communications Manager

(650) 678.4957

jlara@missionhousing.org

Mission Housing partners with Sunday Streets; Will host “Play Streets” in front of Valencia Gardens

San Francisco – On March 10, Livable City kicks off a season of open streets with Sunday Streets Mission, transforming the Valencia corridor from 26th Street to Duboce into a car-free temporary park from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. In partnership with Mission Housing Development Corporation, join Mayor London Breed for a pop-up Play Streets in front of the Valencia Gardens complex, bringing a dedicated block of free activities, games and music for children, residents and neighbors to enjoy and re-envision their streets as accessible, public spaces.

“It’s important for Mission Housing to help create a safe space for residents to enjoy, meet their neighbors, and come together as a community,” said Mission Housing Deputy Executive Director Márcia Contreras. “With our partnership with Sunday Streets and Play Streets, we hope to create awareness that this space is for everyone.”

Inspired by the Ciclovía in Bogotá, Colombia, Sunday Streets is a series of free, fun events empowering local communities to transform one to four miles of car-congested streets into car-free community spaces for kids to play, seniors to stroll, organizations to connect and neighbors to meet. 

“An essential ingredient to any successful community is the opportunity to connect and fun,” said The Neighborhood Empowerment Network (NEN) Director Daniel Homsey. “A pop-up space in front of a housing development gives residents that opportunity.”

Nonprofit Livable City runs both Sunday Streets and Play Streets, a program empowering neighbors to transform their block into an accessible, car-free open space on a regular basis for children, seniors, and neighbors to enjoy. Both programs are sponsored by the SFMTA and other City agencies, and Sunday Streets would not be possible without crucial services like Muni bus re-routing or traffic control officers for public safety.

Project experts from SFMTA and Vision Zero will be on hand throughout the season, providing neighborhood residents and visitors direct access to transit planners and ambassadors dedicated to sustainable streets.

Small businesses, residents, nonprofits and local groups bring activities, volunteers and performances to the car-free routes, with each contributing a distinctive character and energy to the day. A local hire program employs San Francisco residents for outreach and event-day support.

Transforming miles of car-dominated City streets into open space is possible through the collaboration and hard work of hundreds of volunteers, neighbors, nonprofits and small businesses. Donate, exhibit, volunteer or sponsor Sunday Streets in 2019 to be part of a sustainable, greener and more accessible future. For more information, visit www.SundayStreetsSF.com.

Sunday Streets 2019 Season Schedule

March 10 – Mission 1

March 31 – Excelsior 1

April 14 – Tenderloin 1

May 5 – Bayview/Dogpatch

June 9 – Sunset/GGP

July 14 – Mission 2

August 18 – SoMa

September 8 – Tenderloin 2

September 22 – Western Addition

October 20 – Excelsior 2

The Sunday Streets 2019 season is made possible by the following season sponsors: Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), San Francisco Department of Children, Youth & Their Families (DCYF), Mission Housing Development Corporation, San Francisco Department of Public Works (SFPUC), Genentech, Office of Economic and Workforce Development (OEWD), Sutter/CPMC, Golden State Warriors, iHeartMedia, Skip, Sutter/CPMC, Xfinity/Comcast and Bi-Rite

About Sunday Streets

Sunday Streets is a program of the nonprofit Livable City, presented in partnership with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and the San Francisco Department of Public Health and the Shape Up SF Coalition. Additional City support comes from the Department of Public Works, Recreation & Parks Department, SF Police Department, SF County Transportation Authority, San Francisco Mayor London Breed and her offices and the SF Board of Supervisors.

About Livable City

Livable City is dedicated to increasing affordable housing, improving transportation, land use, open space, and environmental policies, and supporting grassroots initiatives to make San Francisco a safer, healthier, and more accessible city. For more information on Livable City, visit: http://www.livablecity.org. For more information about Sunday Streets, including the Sunday Streets event activity guide, visit: www.SundayStreetsSF.com. For information on Muni routes and vehicle access, call 511 or go to www.sfgov.org/311.

RSVP for the event on Facebook, here